Tag Archives: Pakistan

“Military age men” at San Diego’s southern border

Among the several dozen Pakistani and Afghan men who have entered the U.S. illegally, coming into San Diego from Tijuana, two were found to have ties to terrorist groups, according to a letter sent by U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter to the Department of Homeland Security.

Muhammad Azeem and Muktar Ahmad, both in their 20s, surrendered to U.S. Border Patrol agents in September, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. One was listed on the Terrorist Screening Database for “associations with a known or suspected terrorist. The other was a positive match for derogatory information in an alternative database,” according to Hunter’s letter.

Azeem and Ahmad are among dozens of men — described by Border Patrol agents as “military age and carrying U.S. cash” who began entering the U.S. through a Tijuana-based human-smuggling pipeline in September.

Pakistanis and Afghans crossing the border illegally in the San Diego sector are pretty unusual, according to Border Patrol statistics. In 2013, U.S. Customs and Border Protection detained fewer than 400 Pakistanis throughout the entire United States — at the ports of entry, airports, and along the border between ports.

Between October 1, 2014, and Sept. 30, 2015, the San Diego sector of the Border Patrol detained 18 Pakistanis and 1 Afghan, according to Border Patrol statistics. Between October 1 and mid-November of last year, 2 Afghans and 22 Pakistanis reportedly surrendered to Border Patrol agents.

“We have detained more Pakistanis and Afghans in the first month of this fiscal year than we did all last year,” assistant chief Richard Smith confirmed in November.

In the month and a half since mid-November, 3 more Afghans and 6 more Pakistanis were detained by the Border Patrol (not including those detained at the ports of entry).

Customs officials did not return calls for their statistics on detentions at the ports of entry.

The decline in arrests had not lessened concerns, however. Federal agents say they believe that the Pakistanis have begun making an effort to avoid being caught.

Until November, they would enter in groups and seek a federal agent to surrender to, according to union officials. It is believed that they did this because illegal entrants who are not Mexican citizens and who are deemed to not pose a significant threat are generally given a date to appear at immigration court and then released on their own recognizance. (Central Americans coming to Texas and the Roma in San Diego both used the same method to enter the U.S. in the past two years.)

But that method has changed, National Border Patrol Council president Terence Shigg said. While the Border Patrol’s San Diego sector continues to apprehend Pakistanis and Afghans, they are now finding them travelling alone and often farther north of the border than the earlier surrenders.

“It’s very concerning,” Shigg said. “We have no idea what their actual intentions are because we have no effective way of backtracking. Just the males are coming and there’s no way for us to know for certain who they are and why.”

Both Azeem and Ahmad remain in ICE custody, spokeswoman Lauren Mack confirmed. ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations is part of the Joint Terrorism Task Force, she noted, and works closely with the Federal Bureau of Investigation on terrorism-related investigations.

Stratfor vice president of intelligence Fred Burton, interviewed last month, noted that identity documents from Afghanistan and Pakistan should set off alarms.

“The challenge of getting these individuals is getting who they actually are confirmed — proving identity is difficult in that environment,” Burton said. “Afghanistan and Pakistan do not have a robust identification system — these are places where there is tremendous potential for official document and visa fraud.”

Shigg said he believes that federal officials should be talking openly about this new development and committing more resources to keeping people from such countries in custody until they can be completely vetted.

“It’s not as if they don’t have the systems to sort, but they have to dedicate the resources and detention space to sorting this out,” he said. “These are credible threats.”

Advertisements

Pakistan refuses to share nukes with Saudi Arabia #SoTHeySay

Washington: Pakistan ruled out sharing its nuclear weapons with Saudi Arabia, insisting Thursday that the atomic arsenal would continue serving solely for Pakistan’s national defense even as world powers and Iran near a possible nuclear agreement.

Closing a wide-ranging trip to Washington, Foreign Secretary Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry angrily rejected speculation that his country could sell or transfer nuclear arms or advanced technology as “unfounded and baseless.”

Pakistan has long been among the world’s greatest proliferation threats, having shared weapons technology with Iran, Libya and North Korea. And American and other intelligence services have been taking seriously the threat of Saudi Arabia or other Arab countries potentially seeking the Muslim country’s help in matching Iran’s nuclear capabilities, even if the U.S. says there is no evidence of such action right now.

“Pakistan is not talking to Saudi Arabia on nuclear issues, period,” Chaudhry insisted. The arsenal, believed to be in excess of 100 weapons, is focused only on Pakistan’s threat perception from “the East,” Chaudhry said, a clear reference to long-standing rival and fellow nuclear power India.

Chaudhry said his country has significantly cracked down in recent years on proliferation, improving its export controls and providing U.N. nuclear monitors with all necessary information. Pakistan also won’t allow any weapons to reach terrorists, he said.

Pakistan detonated its first nuclear weapons in 1998, shortly after India did.

At the same time, the father of Pakistan’s nuclear program, A.Q. Khan, was shopping advanced technology to many of the world’s most distrusted governments. He sold centrifuges for enriching bomb-making material to the Iranians, Libyans and North Koreans, and also shared designs for fitting warheads on ballistic missiles. He was forced into retirement in 2001.

Concerns now center on how the Sunni Arab governments of the Middle East will respond if the U.S. and other governments clinch a nuclear deal with Shiite Iran by the end of the month. Such questions inevitably lead to Pakistan, the only Muslim country in the nuclear club and one with historically close ties to Saudi Arabia.

Saudi officials, for their part, have repeatedly refused to rule out any steps to protect their country, saying they will not negotiate their faith or their security.

Chaudhry was in the American capital for a U.S.-Pakistan strategic dialogue and meetings with several senior diplomatic and military officials.

The State Department said Wednesday the agenda included “international efforts to enhance nuclear security” as well as nonproliferation and export controls. It described the discussions as “productive” and said the governments would work together to prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction.

Speaking to reporters, Chaudhry praised the progress thus far in the Iran nuclear talks. He told reporters that a diplomatic success would have significant economic benefits for Pakistan, allowing it to complete a long-sought gas pipeline project with its neighbor to the west.

Saudi Arabia Religious Affairs Minister: Pakistan’s Atomic Bomb Belongs To The World Of Islam

23625A snapshot of the Urdu website report

On a visit of Pakistan, Saudi Arabia’s Deputy Minister for Religious Affairs and Dawah Abdul Aziz Al-Ammar has said that Pakistan’s nuclear bomb is not of Pakistan alone but belongs to the entire Islamic world. The Saudi minister’s statement came in the wake of a resolution adopted by the Pakistani parliament that called for a neutral Pakistani stance on the Yemen conflict.

Al-Ammar, who is visiting Pakistan to clarify the Saudi standpoint on the Yemen conflict, stated at a meeting in Karachi that “Pakistan is our friend-country. We hope that at this stage cooperation will be done with us [in Yemen]. He said that Pakistan’s atom [bomb] is not of Pakistan alone but is of the world of Islam. The entire world of Islam is proud of it…”

“We are proud of Pakistan’s atomic program,” said the Saudi minister, according to an April 17 report – titled “Pakistan’s atomic bomb belongs to the world of Islam: Saudi minister” and published by an Urdu-language website.

Speaking about the Iranian role in Yemen, Al-Ammar said: “We have verified evidence that Iran is providing all support to the [Houthi] rebels, and Iran is behind the rebellion. We will not permit anyone to interfere in the Arabian Peninsula.” He added: “We have the proof that the Houthi rebels have acted with Iranian support and Iranian weapons.”

According to the Urdu website, the Saudi minister said that “the rebels and their patrons are dreaming of occupying Haramain Sharifain [the holy cities of Mecca and Medina] following the Yemen invasion.” He added: “We have a brotherly, friendly [relationship] with Pakistan, to the point of being one heart, two souls. Pakistan and Saudi Arabia are mates in every difficulty.” The Saudi minister stated: “We hope that at this difficult time, Pakistan’s people and [military] institutions will support us.”

Abdul Aziz Al-Ammar made the comments on April 16 at the residence of the Saudi Consul General in Karachi. Numerous Pakistani religious scholars and provincial ministers of Sindh of which Karachi is the capital were present on the occasion. Among those present on the occasion were: Mufti Muhammad Rafi Usmani, the Mufti-e-Azam (or Great Mufti) of Pakistan; Sahabzada Abul Khair Muhammad Zubair, leader of Jamiat Ulama-e-Pakistan (Noorani); Dr. Abdur Razzaq Sikandar, emir of Alami Majlis Tahaffuz-e-Khatm-e-Nabuwwat; Mufti Muhammad Naeem, chairman of the Tahaffuz-e-Haramain Sharifain; Sindh minister Ali Nawaz Mehr, and others.

%d bloggers like this: