Tag Archives: Islamic_Jihad

Breaking down the UNHRC report on 2014 Gaza war

 

· Command responsibility: All four IDF reports of alleged war crimes investigations have assumed that general targeting policy was legal and only individual soldiers could have gone beyond the rules of engagement. The report wants investigations of top military and civilian leaders who set targeting policy. This is a major fault line, but Israel has support from a range of foreign military and top academics for its targeting policy.

· Comptroller got more relevant: The UNHRC probe‘s chairperson Mary McGowan-Davis is following the State Comptroller report on war policy-making to see if it addresses her concerns, not addressed in the IDF reports. That report just got a lot more important.

· Turkel Commission: The report and McGowan-Davis hone in on the lack of implementing ‘Recommendation 2’ of Israel’s quasi-government February 2013 Turkel Report on whether its self-investigating satisfies international law. She totally skipped over its conclusion that Israel’s apparatus meets international law requirements and zoned in on only which of the 18 recommendations made by Turkel to improve investigations have not been implemented. The state has been very slow with addressing some of these and this could be an issue since it was an Israel-sponsored group.

· Gaza blockade: The report repeatedly takes Israel to task for the blockade, though the previous UN Palmer Report said that the blockade did not violate international law. Serious blame for lack of Gaza reconstruction was placed on Israel due to the blockade, seemingly ignoring the blame that many UN officials have placed on donor countries for failing to send most of the funds they promised for reconstruction.

· Accepting ICC jurisdiction: The report demands Israel accede to the Rome Statute and accept International Criminal Court jurisdiction. A non-starter from the Israeli point of view.

· Explosive weapons: Judge McGowan-Davis makes a huge point of attacking Israel for use of explosive weapons in those parts of Gaza which are densely populated. But most of Gaza is densely populated and the IDF has said that Hamas intentionally and systematically abused civilian locations to fire rockets, hide weapons and undertake other attacks. The report does not seem to consider how else the IDF could fight Hamas under these circumstances.

· Defining military objectives – targeting residential buildings: There is a debate about whether the IDF had an overly wide definition of military objective, especially in targeting residential buildings. The report then recognizes that Hamas fought from civilian areas which can convert those areas into military objectives, but perplexingly seemed to say that Hamas’ actions do not modify the legal analysis or obligations for the IDF.

· Warnings: The report unequivocally declares “roof-knocking,” firing a missile without a warhead onto a roof so it will not explode, but will make a loud bang and scare civilians into evacuating before attacking with an armed missile, as ineffective. The Goldstone Report made the same declaration, but whereas there are many international critics of the policy, many foreign military figures and top military law academics have declared the tactic effective, or even cutting-edge and worthy of emulation.

· Israeli investigations of alleged war crimes: McGowan-Davis is highly specific demanding not only investigations, but essentially also indictments, convictions and even sufficiently serious punishments.

· Palestinian investigations of alleged war crimes: McGowan-Davis only demands that there be criminal proceedings with nowhere near the same specificity. This could be a more lenient hand and double-standard, or, in light of her harsh condemnation of Gazan indiscriminate rocket fire, it could be she realizes they have done nothing and nuanced demands only have a chance with Israel.

· IDF release of classified information: The IDF has been complimented by supporters for releasing unprecedented information in its four reports about the military situation on the ground. The report said that too little information has been released and while realizing the IDF may jeopardize its intelligence sources, essentially demands the IDF release far more information. This is a major fault line for judging borderline cases where civilians were killed.

· Proportionality: McGowan-Davis seems to imply that IDF was obligated to completely change targeting policy, including possibly refraining from using missiles and artillery mid-war, after initial casualty reports. This is another major fault line and whereas, she cites one case from an international war crimes tribunal supporting that idea, but there are counter-cases.

· Was Israel’s report of last week referenced: It was unclear whether the report would take into account Israel’s major report released last week. The report did add references to that report, though the reports disagree on a myriad of issues.

Stand With American Infidels in our Fight for Freedom

10th Crusade

I started iranaware.com as a hobby in 2005 & over the years it has grown into literaly a full time job all on its own. My hopes & desires for the funds are to cover the start up costs to take iranaware.com to the next level and Ill handle the rest. I want to add storage, high def video, & a much more modern site all together, where Ill be able to provide more quality content. Also the faith & support of you people in helping out with the site will give me a mental boost that Im doing what is right  not just for myself but for the whole free world. ( I get a lot of death threats for doing it as well.) But, I am not scared of them so BY achieving this goal, it will  entail me to keep the site running 100% free of cost & free of ads as well. I average about 3-5 hours a day doing research & keeping up on it all so every little bit helps trust me. I spend my days caring for my 93 yo grandma with dementia so when I say it all helps, I truly mean it
ISIS 2
I will be upgrading all the content, posting the entire Islamic State video collection as well as releases from Boko Haram, al-Qaeda, Hezbollah, al-Nursra & more. I also will have a helper to ensure that quality & the truth about radical Islam is available 24/7 for those that are not too scared to hear it. As the only country on this great Earth with little things like freedom of speech, our rights are being more &  more eroded each day, & we must  band together and protect each other. Also, other major items to continue to be covered daily is the slow extermination of Middle Eastern Christianity, & the continual threats against Israel that must be documented, no matter how much the US Government & the United Nations tries to cover it up. As of now iranaware.com is averaging around a 100,000 plus unique visitors a year, lets help move that up to a 1-200,000 a month.. I love doing this, and considering we reach so many, we cant stop here.

Bibi 2015

Don’t just look at it as helping me & the website iranaware.com, look at it as helping us all spread awareness to what could turn out to be preparing for the next true world war

Thanks, American Infidels

If you can spare it, even if its a 1.00, it all helps with the cause. Any excess funds will be donated to Boston area charities!

http://www.gofundme.com/ScrewISIS

Please, a thousand thank-yous, & long live the United States & a Free Jewish State of Israel

and dont forget..

Obama s3

Inside Gaza’s tunnels, militants get ready for the next war

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In an olive grove close to houses in the southern Gaza Strip, the earth slides open smoothly, revealing a sight to terrify Israel.

A deep pit containing a 120mm (4in) mortar tube, and three fighters from the militant group – Palestinian Islamic Jihad.

Fully armed and in combat fatigues, the men are all wearing head torches. They move quickly, in well-drilled movements, loading and unloading the tube from a stack of mortars at the back of their position.

This is a show of readiness, a show of strength, for the next war with Israel. It is a war that both the militants and the Israeli military, on the other side of the border, believe could come again soon.

The hidden mortar pit is right by the border with Israel, or so I am told.

I cannot be entirely sure as the armed fighters blindfolded me, searched me for tracking devices and removed my mobile phones before the journey.

Viewed as a terrorist group in the West, Islamic Jihad is committed to Israel’s destruction.

Quentin Sommerville was blindfolded before gaining access to a Palestinian Islamic Jihad tunnel

At the back of the firing position is a small curtain that leads into a tunnel cut through the earth. It turns a corner and enters a larger, even deeper tunnel, perhaps 20m down.

Its reinforced concrete walls have an arched roof, tall enough for the men of Islamic Jihad to stand up, and run through it.

This is their escape route, running for hundreds of metres, its exit – or exits – unknown.

The well-constructed walls glisten as condensation reflects off the lights, powered by a car battery, that runs along the length of the tunnel. Deep underground, the air in the tunnel is cool.

Standing inside, his face hidden, is a fighter, with the nom de guerre, Abu Hamza.

“In the last war we noticed that every moving thing on the surface of the earth was bombed, whether it was ambulances, civilians or fighters walking on the street,” he said.

“So [the tunnels] are our hiding place, away from the eyes of the Zionist enemy… we used them to launch [mortars and anti-tank] missiles”.

Islamic State fighter in Gaza tunnelPalestinian militants can move fast inside the tunnels

The tunnel was used in the last war, and it will be used in the next, he said.

As tensions – including attacks – continue between Hamas, who govern Gaza, and the Palestinian Authority, Islamic Jihad wants to make its presence felt.

The 50-day conflict in Gaza left at least 2,189 Palestinians dead, including more than 1,486 civilians, according to the UN, and 11,000 injured. On the Israeli side, 67 soldiers and six civilians were killed, with scores more wounded.

Large parts of neighbourhoods in Gaza are in ruins, and the Strip is in the midst of a humanitarian crisis which has left many thousands of families homeless.

Six months on, the rubble from the war lies mostly uncleared and there has been little rebuilding.

Israeli worries

In Israel, communities along the border are well drilled at responding to the rocket and mortar attacks. But they fear even more the tunnels that Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad built under the border fence.

People in Israel's city of Ashkelon take cover as a siren sounds to warn of incoming rockets from Gaza. Photo: July 2014Last year’s war was a battle between Israeli artillery and aircraft and militant mortars and rockets from Gaza

Some 32 tunnels were discovered crossing the border and there are believed to be hundreds more inside Gaza.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has promised to eradicate the border tunnels but it seems that the threat, though reduced, still remains.

The war in Gaza took place in the skies – a battle between Israeli artillery and aircraft and militant mortars and rockets from Gaza.

But it was also an underground war. Israel was caught unprepared as the militants used tunnel warfare to an extent never seen before.

According to Col Dado, a commander of southern Gaza for the Israel Defense Forces, “the main goal of the tunnels is not to make peace – it is to go and attack civilians and to capture or kidnap soldiers.

“We are worried about it and trying to invent solutions to this problem.”

He would not give details on how Israel is doing so. It is thought to be using enhanced scanning equipment to identify tunnel sites, which it then destroys.

‘We stood our ground’

On Gaza’s southern border, another battle is raging. Near daily explosions can be seen and heard as Egyptian forces extend a buffer zone with Gaza to a kilometre wide.

Egypt’s soldiers move around in armoured vehicles. Border controls have been tightened and they are using explosives to destroy homes and smuggling tunnels that have been a lifeline to Gaza.

Egyptian President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi blames Hamas and others for aiding attacks in the Sinai.

Gaza is being cornered, more isolated than ever before. In Gaza City, demonstrators recently took to the streets to protest against Egyptian policies.

Publicly at least, Islamic Jihad refuses to acknowledge Egypt’s role as hostile.

Abu Abdullah, another fighter, said, “we believe that Egypt’s role in the conflict is as a… booster of the Palestinian cause”.

But when I ask another militant when he thinks the next war will come, he jokes: “With Israel or with Egypt?”

And another war with Israel is inevitable, say the militants of Islamic Jihad. They say they lost 145 fighters during the last conflict. Many more civilians were killed. So what was achieved?

“Our biggest achievement is that we stood our ground, and we challenged the occupier,” said Abu Ibrahim, a commander of their Saraya al-Quds brigade.

“Unlike the whole world, we are still able to say ‘no’ to them, ‘no’ to the occupation. We are still able to resist.”

Islamic Jihad fightersIslamic Jihad fighters have been training hard in recent days

Along the border with Israel, it remains relatively quiet. The six-month ceasefire is holding.

But Col Dado, like the men of Islamic Jihad on the other side of the fence, is pessimistic.

“We can see their side is [rebuilding] the tunnels and [preparing themselves] for the next fight,” he said.

“We are doing the same. I hope it will be a long time from today, but I’m not pretty sure about it.

“So – sooner rather than later?” I ask.

“Unfortunately,” the colonel responds.

Peace? Destroy Hamas

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Israel Opinion

The Israeli political left says that an agreement and compromise with the Palestinian Authority will destroy Hamas. In my opinion, it’s quite the opposite: Destroying the Hamas regime is a condition for a compromise agreement with the Palestinians.

It’s not a sufficient condition – there are many other conditions and moves (for example, freezing settlement construction instead of releasing Hamas terrorists) – but it is a necessary condition.

Israel can make Hamas collapse, but Israel doesn’t want it to collapse and has even declared so in advance. From this we can conclude that the existence of a “weakened” Hamas serves all kinds of interests, matches all kinds of outlooks, both personal and ideological, makes the political compromise unachievable and intensifies the suspiciousness and dissention.

Millions of Israelis are rightfully asking themselves: If all the Palestinians are like Hamas, how can we agree to withdraw from even one more kilometer? And the conclusion is: Let’s settle, let’s annex and let’s forget about the dreams.

Some believe Hamas is suffering from a youth revolt syndrome and is acting like an adolescent hooligan. The more it grows up, the more it will calm down, become domesticated, become tamed and make rational decisions. Rational, meaning decisions Israel would like it to make.

I see it as a false hope stemming from a deep misunderstanding of the reasons for Hamas’ existence as a fanatic Islamist military organization.

It’s not that Hamas is operating aimlessly. Its aim is to make the lives of both the Israelis and the Palestinians miserable and to increase the hatred between them up to the point of no return.

The big wave of terror attacks carried out by Hamas began shortly after the Oslo Accords, about 20 years ago, and was quite successful as far as the organization was concerned. Hundreds of Israelis were killed, the public lived in fear, radicalization spread and grew stronger, Israel’s prime minister was murdered and the realization of the agreement ran aground.

Since that wave of terror, our governments have sent the IDF on several operations aimed at weakening Hamas rather than, God forbid, eradicating it.

After every operation we hear that Hamas has been weakened, so much that it can now fire rockets at all parts of Israel and dig a network of tunnels which make the border fences look like a joke. It’s better not to think about what its current “weakening” will lead to.

Hamas’ big day – and Israel’s big missed opportunity – arrived when it took over the Gaza Strip. The takeover put Israel in danger and gave us a recognized international right to intervene and prevent the border area from turning into a terror compound.

But the Israeli government openly avoided that. It even avoided helping the Palestinian Authority, Gaza’s legitimate landlord. Why should we care that the Palestinians are fighting each other? It doesn’t concern us.

According to that same perception which has not changed since then, Israel doesn’t have to worry about who controls Gaza, but only about the type of weapons in Gaza. As if weapons fire on their own.

Accepting Hamas’ takeover of Gaza was a first-class strategic mistake. It got us entangled in every possible trouble, starting with Gaza turning into a rocket arsenal to the decision to impose an economic and environmental siege on the Strip, a siege which affected a poor and helpless population and is perceived in the world as a horrible crime. Even worse than the rockets. Hamas used the siege to justify its acts of war, including the latest one.

The Israeli government eventually began letting go of the siege, secretly, gradually, at an extent which wasn’t enough to create an economic perspective for Gaza’s residents. According to a public opinion poll conducted recently, Hamas has become much less popular than Fatah in Gaza. This is the motive and the explanation for its recent actions.

 

 

 There is a fear that in the post-Hamas era, worse and more dangerous jihad forces will rise to power among the Palestinian public. They may indeed rise to power, but only if we fail to do anything to advance an agreement with the Palestinian Authority while eradicating the Hamas rule.

If we make progress towards a diplomatic agreement, clearing Gaza of Hamas will also clear the long road to peace.

 

 

The Trouble with Gaza

by Yaakov Lappin

Under the rule of the Hamas regime, the Gaza Strip has transformed itself in recent years into one of the world’s most active terrorist havens, and this radical enclave is destined to burst.

Currently, Israel’s government and defense establishment are choosing to contain, rather than uproot, the extensive terrorist infrastructure that has taken root in the Hamas-run enclave.

Hamas is so far cooperating with this approach. It is seeking to expand its local rocket production industry; increase the number of its gunmen, and consolidate its grip on power. All of these long-range goals require time and stability.

Israeli defense officials have acknowledged, however, that containment is a time-limited tactic.

 

A Hamas military parade in Gaza.

 

In addition to Hamas, Gaza hosts an array of radical Islamist armed organizations, such as Iran’s direct proxy, Islamic Jihad, and a growing assortment of armed groups affiliated with Al-Qaeda — all of which reject the legitimacy of a truce with Israel, and which seek to challenge it.

The ease with which smaller terror groups can challenge a ceasefire was apparent in recent days, when Gazan terrorists fired several rockets at the Israeli town of Sderot. The attack set off air raid sirens and sent civilians fleeing for cover. This assault was accompanied by a rocket-propelled grenade attack directed at an Israel Defense Force [IDF] patrol operating along the fence that separates Israel from Gaza. That attack failed to cause injuries.

The Israel Air Force [IAF] responded within a couple of hours, uncharacteristically launching daytime air strikes on targets in south and central Gaza.

Hamas, for its part, acted to restore the calm.

Hamas’s desire for a break from direct conflict with Israel appears genuine.

According to Israeli intelligence estimates, Hamas has amassed over 5,000 short-range rockets and dozens of medium-range rockets that all can reach greater Tel Aviv, and place 70% of Israeli civilians in its range. There is little doubt that Hamas would like to build more rockets. Any renewed clash with the IDF, however, would put these assets in immediate jeopardy; the IAF would destroy them.

Additionally, Hamas is exploiting the calm to build extremely long attack tunnels into Israel. They stretch for more than a kilometer, and can be used to inject terror cells into Israel to carry out terror attacks or kidnap soldiers. Hamas pours millions of dollars into these tunnels. The IDF often discovers and destroys them.

Hamas’s fighting divisions consist of some 16,000 gunmen. In a full-scale conflict with Israel, their fate would be compromised — meaning that should war erupt, Hamas’s very existence as a government could be undermined. Hence, Hamas seems to prefer to keep the truce going.

The trouble for Hamas is that it is not alone. With the aid of Iranian funds and training, Islamic Jihad has built up a fighting force of 5,000 armed guerrillas. Islamic Jihad has more than 2,000 rockets, and that number is growing. Should Iran’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Khamenei, give the order to Islamic Jihad, a confrontation in Gaza could quickly begin, leaving Hamas with the option of either trying to face down a fellow terror organization or joining it in a war against Israel.

There are also 4,000 or so members of smaller Gazan terror groups, each armed with its own mini-arsenal of rockets, bombs, and assault weapons. Many of these groups are loyal to the vision of Al Qaeda leader Ayman Al Zawahiri of an Islamic caliphate, and maintain ties with fellow jihadis in the neighboring Sinai Peninsula.

These groups are, it seems, outraged by what they see as Hamas’s soft policy on Israel, and have pledged soon to resume hostilities against it.

Therefore, even if Hamas wanted to extend a truce for years, its ability to do so is seriously in doubt. Further, as Israel’s policy of containment is founded on the idea of a deterred Hamas reigning in the other terror organizations, a failure by Hamas to do so would lead to a collapse of that approach.

It is for this day that the IDF is preparing around the clock. In the meantime, as Gaza continues to fester with radical terror organizations, its unfortunate population continues to pay the price.

Don’t feed Palestinian Arab babies food. Better to feed them lies.

EoZ Rocks: We mentioned last week that Jordanian MP Tareq Khoury called for Jordan to kidnap Israeli diplomats and tourists.

Here is the banner photo  Khoury uses on Facebook.

Don’t feed the baby food. Feed it lies instead.

Just reason #1904 that peace is impossible.

 

The Supreme Council of Cyberspace

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